Cover of the Wanted Magazine September Art issue 2022

Before the Covid 19 lockdown in 2020, two friends and I had planned to go to Dakar for the art biennial. But after it was cancelled we had to cancel our plans as well. This year, since I have been living in Niger, I decided that my birthday would be spent in Dakar, with friends, surrounded by art. That’s exactly what I did and you can read about a small bit of the trip in the piece I wrote for Wanted Magazine’s September issue. The trip definitely pushed Dakar into the top 5 of my favourite cities anywhere on the planet. I cannot wait to go back there soon.

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Lesela Magazine by The Ninevites

Some time ago, Nkuli Mlangeni-Berg asked me to contribute an essay to a publication she was putting together called Lesela. I wrote an essay about my late mom. I am literally counting the days till I next see Nkuli so I can get my hands on a copy and read all the stories in the magazine from the all-woman team. With the project, Nkuli wanted to honour and explore connections between people and textiles across the African continent. The magazine explores contemporary African textiles through the lens of makers, craft and materiality.

Edited by: Nkuli Mlangeni-Berg, Leila Khalifa, Uma Ramiah
Contributors: Lebogang Tlhako, Alix -Rose Cowie, Noncedo Gxekwa, Neo Maditla.

Keep up with the Ninevites on their website, and buy theri amzing products, including the rugs I wrote a longform article about for Futuress that you can read here.

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Artist Lawrence Lemaoana on coding narratives into textiles and his uneasy relationship with the art world.

Picture this scene: A toddler is trailed by his mom and dad as he plays in the gardens of an iconic art museum in Paris. The three of them are on the grass behind a spectacular ultra-contemporary museum that, according to ArchDaily, catalyzed “innovation in digital design and construction” while “evoking the tradition of 19th-century glass garden buildings.” As he walks, the dad notices several signs in French with the words Jardin d’acclimatation, but doesn’t pay too much attention. Later, back at the hotel, he googles the name, and discovers a shocking truth: less than 80 years ago, that site was a human zoo.

Read more on Futuress

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The women in Sethembile Msezane’s work demand your attention. They stand, on top of mountains, on plinths in the middle of Rhodes Must Fall crowds. They wake up on beds in the middle of a field. They stand defiantly with their fists up on public holidays; ring large bells to signal the return of those women whose deaths are quickly forgotten. They kneel on top of World Heritage sites diagnosing the world’s illnesses and drawing attention to our disconnect from nature. In whichever medium we meet her work — film, photography, performance, sculpture or drawings — Sethembile Msezane is always commemorating the stories of women. Black women in particular.

You can read the rest of the story on Arts24

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WESTRIDGE Senior Secondary School in Mitchells Plain seems an unlikely birthplace for South Africa’s graffiti movement, but in the late 1980s, that’s what it became.

The school provided the first canvases for young, frustrated graffiti artists who wanted a space in which to express themselves.Graffiti artist Falko is one of the pioneers of the art form in Cape Town, and started developing his skill while at Westridge.

He explains that although there already was graffiti being painted in areas in Lentegeur and Westridge, the school was the first place where he worked on a wall.

Read more on Cape Argus

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The urban landscape includes the world of the down-trodden and faceless, who sleep under bridges and stand like landmarks at traffic intersections. It is from this nuanced, strange and challenging existence that graffiti artist Faith47 draws inspiration.

“In the years of painting in the streets I have explored many hidden-away spaces, empty Joburg high-rise buildings, old factories and pockets of broken architecture. I have been documenting the marks I find — scrawled poems on the walls, gang tags, love stories, complaints and observations carefully pencilled on walls, drawings and sentences written by stowaways who sleep under bridges,” she says.

Read more in the Cape Argus

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